Archive for the ‘leica’ Category

Portrait of the Players.  Leica M2, 50mm f1.5 Summarit, Kodak Tri-X Film

ken262

Leica M2, 50mm Summarit f1.5, Kodak Tri-X Film

ken82

ken272

ken72

ken152

ken12

6x61

Ohmigod, is that a Saturn?  And look, remember when you had to pedal your bike!

The year is 2066.

We’re teleporting to different parts of the earth, holding meetings on virtual beaches while sitting at home, and having robots do all the chores.

And we’re using the latest camera technology, which means no camera at all–just look at something and it’s captured.

We’re lamenting not having any photos from the first quarter of the century, since we didn’t bother to print any of our pictures, and they all got lost in dead computers and outdated phones and hard drives that last booted up decades ago.  And some old program, Facehead, or something, that was supposed to save them all.  Yeah right!

Plus, we don’t have any computers that use USB anymore!   How ancient that technology!

leica6x6

My Leica M2, still going strong in 2066.

As we sit looking out the window, our Leica M2s and M3s and Rolleiflexes still just as functional as they ever were, we load a roll of film and take a walk to go capture some street photos of the day.

The sky is full of PTDs–personal travel devices.  Everywhere, our brains connect with each other through telepathic waves.  Cars have long ago ceased to exist.

And we find ourselves thinking about the good old days.  Like 50 years ago, when things were simpler.  Sure there was that terrible fiasco with President Trump, but thankfully he was quickly arrested and tried for his crimes.  And then President Sanders’ brought all nations together.  War ended and America prospered, which is why we have such a great economy, plentiful jobs and USA-made robots and devices today.

But still, taking photos of present day just doesn’t seem as cool as the old days.  Back then, there were those cool Nissan Rogues, BMW sedans and those crazy Mini Coopers.  God, haven’t seen one of those in years!

What I wouldn’t do to be able to go back in time to 2016 and photograph them.  What a treat that would be.  But that’s crazy talk.

6x62

Look at that old BMW, when they still had wheels!  And drivers!

That’s just what we did in 2016, fifty years ago, when we were enamored by photos of old cars from the 1960s and 1970s.  So busy looking at the old cars, we missed the shots of those cool 2016 cars then.

All I know is I’m glad my Leicas lasted.  And my Rolleiflex.  Because when film made its resurgence in 2022, we were the only ones who knew how to make real photographs.  The rest make memory records, but we make photographs.

Which is why we’re the wealthiest photographers because of our forethought.  Way to go!

6x63

“Ah, look, the good old days.”  (Overheard circa 2016)

Time traveling.  That’s what people will be doing 50 years from today in 2116–looking back on life in 2066 (“Ah, the good old days,” they’ll say.).

That photo of the PTD fuel station that looks like nothing now, just a bunch of hovering vehicles powering up?  Add 50 years.  It needs time to become valuable.  Once time passes, familiar elements fade away.  Buildings change.  The cars, the shops, the cities.  Then the photos take on meaning.

I’m no math whiz, but here’s the equation: [P+T-GP!]   (Photograph + Time = Great Photograph!)  The photo needs to be good, too.  Let’s not forget that.

Ask Stephen Shore.  Or William Eggleston. They both knew the equation.

If I were back in 2016, I’d go out and shoot ordinary things, with an eye to the future.  Because maybe I’m not shooting them for me.  Maybe they’re historical photos for the Shorpy galleries of tomorrow.  (So glad that company is still going strong, with galleries around the world.)

But alas, I can’t time travel.  They say that technology will be ready in another twenty years but they’ve been saying that forever.

I better get shooting!

…then a detail photo, one that lets us really see something that we might have missed, is worth a million, too!

DSCF5662

DSCF9695

DSCF1229

_1030876

You can see more at ColoradoFaces.com

…then a comedic one is worth a million as well.  Because there are things in our world that are genuinely funny.  And capturing them is its own special joy.

L1008753-Edit

DSCF8943

You can see more at ColoradoFaces.com

I realize I shoot film a lot, but I have multiple bodies with film loaded, and I tend to shoot conservatively, just a frame or two on a person or a subject.

I want to change that.  I just added motor drives to two of my Nikons, an F3, and an FM2, the cameras I used as a photojournalist throughout the 80’s and 90s.

I want to shoot more content.  And not hold back.  I think I do that–hold back.   I want to fire up the cameras and move film through them more quickly.

The motor drive will let me do that.  It’s license to burn!

ml002

ml001

L1074213-Edit

_1030723

I was a photojournalist in the 1980s and 1990s in Trenton, NJ, working for a daily newspaper.  Left in 2001 and the paper laid off most of its staff shortly thereafter.  What a great heyday we had, though, while it lasted.  It was incredible.  Shooting political events, pro sports, spot news, big NJ events.

 

L1062297-Edit

I like shooting in urban settings more than in nature.  I like the way elements can come together in an instant when I’m walking about shooting street.  This shot for me works well only because we can see the driver in the car on the right, and there is a car turning in front of me to help balance the foreground.  Plus the bikers, of course.  Lovely documentation of life in the early 2000s that will be looked at in 100 years, and they’ll find our modes of transportation primitive, I’m sure.

L1062307-Edit

I make a point when I’m crossing streets to shoot between cars and into lanes that would ordinarily be difficult to shoot in.  I love her big Mercedes, and again, that I can see her face.

I need to take a hike on concrete!

smokebreak

Covered in dust from working a construction project, Larry takes a well-earned late afternoon smoking break. On a beautiful, unseasonably 70-degree day in Boulder, Colorado.

carney2