What Made Photography Valuable?

Helen Levitt and Walter Rosenblum made street photographs in New York in the 1930s through the 1950s. Vivian Maier made street photographs in the 1950s through the 1970s. What made them relevant, what made their work valuable? It took a special person, a real photographic artist to go out in public and shoot film photographs... Continue Reading →

A Photographic Revolution In the Air

I'm reading a biography of the legendary photographer, Alfred Stieglitz by Dorothy Norman. I'm finding it a fascinating read, how he challenged rules. When he was young and played sports, he often wanted to change the rules of the game. In his photography and his life, he wanted to not "hit the target, but hit... Continue Reading →

Humor & Story in Street Photography

Everyone loves a laugh. I think that's safe to say as a generalization, because a joke is a story. But not all documentary and street photography can be comical. But some just are--that's life for you. I spent a day in New York City and was walking through and saw this scene below unfold. I... Continue Reading →

In a New York Moment

There are no self-taught photographers. There is no photographer who isn't influenced by photographs they've seen. We all are exposed to a lot of photographs on a daily basis, and if we study the photographers who came before us, those considered the Masters--William Eggleston, Steven Shore, Robert Frank, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Helen Levitt, Vivian Maier, Joel... Continue Reading →

Selling the Steak, But Not the Sizzle

I stopped at a camera store in Allentown Pennsylvania named Dan‘s Camera City and the building was a long tan and blue building that didn’t have an interesting creative exterior, the store's sign was partially overgrow with shubbery, and when I went inside and looked around I thought this is exactly how so many camera... Continue Reading →

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑